Jeff Smallwood Photography
Putting Photos in Motion
share
Nov 4, 2012

UPDATE: Posted a 2nd video. Link at the bottom.

I recently attended the Calvert Photography Club's November photo trip to Great Falls. We visited both the Virginia and Maryland sides of the park on the same morning. Being only 3 days after hurricane Sandy departed the Washington, DC area, I expected the water levels to be much higher than they were. However, you could definitely tell there had been a jump in river flow. It was much dirtier than usual and the water level was a little high (much higher than it had been over the majority of the summer).

Being an overcast day, even after the sun was "up" I was able to take long exposures in the nice even light. When we crossed the first bridge to Olmstead Island on the Maryland side of the park, I stopped to take a few shorter long exposures (in the ½ - 1 second range) of the water going under the bridge.

I'd blogged before about how to turn burst mode photos into an animated GIF, but this time I wanted to try a video from the long exposures. Following the same technique described in the other post, this time I used Photoshop's export to video option. Below are the results. Each photo was 0.4 second exposure, and each frame is displayed for 0.14 seconds in the video. So the motion actually speeds up real life by a factor of 2.85.

Click here to view the video full screen. It is in HD resolution. Or you can view a smaller copy below.

Video created from long exposure photographs at
Great Falls, Maryland


After I processed the above video I did a 2nd set of photos that I took with burst mode. This one was converted to an oil painting using the filter by that name in Photoshop. This video I tweened 1 frame between each shot as described in the other blog post linked above.

View the second video full screen in high-def or watch in the window below.


Comments
There are no comments on this post. Be the first one to comment using the form below.
Add Comment

Comments temporarily disabled.